Xcena’s Perogies: A Divine Affair

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pierogi.jpg What crab feeds are to Northern California, pierogi dinners are to Ohio. Instead of cracking Dungeness with a nice glass of chardonnay, we Buckeyes look forward to heapin’ helpings of cheese, sauerkraut and potato-stuffed dumplings sauteed in butter and onions. Washed down with a side of Dr. Pepper.

Mother Nature may provide the bounty of crab. But in good Eastern European families, it’s somebody’s mother making the pierogi (or perogies) – a tradition of rolled dough and savory stuffing that’s passed down from generation to generation.

In Healdsburg, it’s Mother Xcena who’s the force behind A Divine Affair’s handmade Ukranian style dumplings ($16) filled with either potatoes and cheese, slow roast pork, oxtail or sauerkraut.  Daughter (and owner) Kahleen Nowak’s mans the stove, pan searing them with plenty of butter and onions — an upscale version of my Ohio favorite. Decorated with little ribbons of sour cream. Oh joy.

These rustic little pillows of deliciousness are a taste of home — no matter where you’re from.

Eastern European classics, however, are only part of the menu. Kahleen does a very beety borscht with local beets, wilted cabbage and
smoked ham hocks, but her rotating menu also includes game
hen, flank steak, duck breast and lunchtime panini and her own fresh-baked breads. Check out the menu

A Divine Affair is open for lunch (11:30am to 2:30pm) and dinner (5:30pm to 9pm) Wednesday through Saturday. Sunday brunch on their back patio starting at 11:30am and dinner until 5pm. 330 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg, 707.433.1035.

Author: biteclub

Food Dining and Restaurants in Sonoma County and beyond, BiteClubEats.com is Wine Country dining with Drive-Thru Sensibility.

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7 Comments

  1. My Gosh Len You are correct! The Open Table website honors our hours of operation, and A Divine Affair website will be getting an update and makeover quite soon.
    We also have a phone number with a recorded greeting sharing all this info for you.
    We feature our signature dishes of Ukrainain Style Perogi and Borscht which are always available.
    Cheers!

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  2. The Devine Affair web site does NOT list the hours of operation.
    Also, the web menu does not mention pierogi, which was the subject of the Bite Club article.
    No point going to Healdsburg for a restaurant that may or may not be open and may or may not offer pierogi.
    –len

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  3. :) Actually~ we remodeled for 6 weeks at the end of January and built our beautiful dining bar! Our Hours are 5:00 pm – 9:30 pm Wednesday – Sunday (Closed Mondays & Tuesdays)
    Most restaurants in Healdsburg close between lunch and dinner service, and some do reserve a day or two during the week for human necessity! sorry to disappoint an obvious expert! Reservations and current hours of operation are available through our website or opentable! Cheers!

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  4. Devine Affair was closed for a short period of time and then reopen. Since then it’s hours seem to be very sporatic. Most restuarants in Healdsburg are open all day being that it is a tourist town but Devine is open on a more or less when the owner feels like it basis. Must be a hobby.

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  5. Devine Affair was closed for a short period of time and then reopen. Since then it’s hours seem to be very sporatic. Most restuarants in Healdsburg are open all day being that it is a tourist town but Devine is open on a more or less when the owner feels like it basis. Must be a hobby.

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  6. yum, sign me up…..

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  7. I love pirogi (or pierogi) and am glad to see an article about them and a place serving them. Being half Russian, I have grown up with their Russian equivalent (although the name differs – see below). I just want to point out a common error made above: regardless of which Slavic language from which the word is being derived, the singular is pirog (or pierog – it depends on which language from which you are translating – Polish, Russian, etc. – and how you transliterate it). Pirogi (or pierogi) is the plural. It is incorrect to add an “s” on the end, especially since it’s added to the end of the version that is already plural.
    I also want to add that the dish exists in slight variations in several Slavic countries, particularly Poland, Russia, Byelorussia, and the Ukraine, but the name usage differs. The pierogi as typically known in the US are like the Polish version. Russians & Ukrainians have the same dish that Poles call pierogi, but they generally call them pelmeni or vareniki. In Russian, the word “pirogi” means a different food, much larger and more like a savory pie, not dumplings (if anyone has had pirozhki – again that is the plural, those are “small pirogi”).

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